Assignment: Cues and Musicality

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    Profile photo of Janet Hanseth
    Janet Hanseth
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    Originally posted by Sandi on tribe.net.Alright, heres a little something I thought Id have you point out. br/br/Cues are important and sometimes they are subtle. If you arent careful, you might send a cue without knowing it. Please identify, in the first song, the (almost) miscue.br/br/Also in the first song, I found the musicality in this particular performance to be used quite properly. Please discuss the music phrasing and our use of it. For instance, where do you hear traveling and where do you hear "do something"? :} I know this song is synthesized, but just use the names of instruments that it sounds like, if you need to. Alternately, tell us what about this performance makes it make sense. Does that make sense? ;} Think group, not individual.br/br/a href=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeQ3kOtmlTc title=www.youtube.com/watchwww.youtube.com/watch/a

    #76142

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Valizan on tribe.net.Miscue comes in at 1:18. There is a glance to the right that looks like it was cuing an Arabic Hip Twist Flourish, but the flourish itself didnt happen. Group caught that is wasnt going to happen until it got cued a second time. br/br/Musicality: This song has so much to play with! The thing I noticed was that at the 2 min. mark, the there is a deep booming drum that screams for a deep booming hip move: Like Chico. And the lead went for it. I would have also maybe chosen Double Choo Choos there because the hip would nail all the boomin beats. br/br/Love that a lot of the travelling happens during bridges in the chorus when the musician has put in ... what I consider to be... breathers. br/br/At 2:14 there is a synthMizmar that has the feel of rolling along, and the trio uses it to advantage to circle and lead change before the groove that propels the song comes back into play.br/br/What makes this performance make sense, to me at least... YMMV... is that the song is very percussive, but it also has a driving melody that has its own sharp percussion. br/br/The dancers reflect that in using a palette of moves that are percussive (Chico, Egyptians) when the music is percussive, but when the melody comes in stronger, the dancers adjust down a bit on the percussive elements in their movement. br/br/For instance at 1:18 when the lead dancer is doing Arabic with a hip twist the music is not so driving. There is that drum accent brrrtDAT! brrrrDAT! which is caught with the hips not having to be as percussive. br/br/At 2:53 the lead dancer starts doing Egyptians, and keeps doing them, building a degree of tension until unleashing a Full-Turn Egyptian at 3:05 on an phrase change in the music.br/br/And saving the calibrated spin combination usage to the end made an effective climax to the set. That FauxMizmar sound in there floating over the drum rhythm and the spins float the dancers above it too. Stopping on the dime is cool. 😀

    #76143

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Jennifer on tribe.net.Good work on the almost missed cue, Valizan. ;)br/br/The only part of the musicality that didnt quite agree with me was at 2:03. That part of the song (is that what Valizan is referring to as faux-Mizmar?) really stands out for me, so deserves to bit hit with a new move to show it off, and carrying over the second half of a move (Chico) here seemed like a missed opportunity. (Incidentally, that part of the song sounds like an arabic traveling backwards to me, but no matter the move, I think that spot should be hit with something new.)

    #76144

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Erika on tribe.net.I noticed the Arabic Hip Twist flowrish almost-cue, it just happened to us in the last performance. A possible second moment in which maybe there was a little something is in the calibrated spins in fade formation, in which the temporary leader is doing spins with arms at shoulder level while the followers were keeping the right arm slightly up. I assumed the temporary leader was giving, if not a cue, a signal (as in "lets keep the arms down for this set of spins") without knowing it by unintencionally bringing the right arm at the same level of the left. br/br/ I love the musicality of that piece, it feels like the dancers are effortly surfing of the waves of music. Personally I dont hear a point that definately tells me "travel" and others that says "do something", I do hear parts where there is more melody and others that are more drum centered. I feel one could either travel with the drums and stay with the melody, or viceversa, and it would still make sense to me. br/What makes me really like the musicality of the performance is how new steps are placed at the beginning of a new musical sentence, and how this new move is in harmony with the specific new musical element. For example when at about 2:10 the dancers circle around during what sounds to me as a platou part, then settle in formation exactly when the music changes, and a new sentence is murmured: the music is sweet and quiet, and the new step is a shimmy shoulder combo which to me goes very well with it, because the movement is small, gathered, elegant and in beautiful contrast with the vivacious travelling in circle with turns of a moment before. br/br/To me it makes sense how, in several points of the performance, there is a feeling of waiting and suspence, and then this anticipation feeling gets completely satisfied by a new step that underlines the musical change. For example, the arm change from above head to shoulder height in the Turkish Shimmy at 0:47-48, or at 1:32-34 to go from Egyptian to Arabic Hip Twist.br/br/I also loved the ending, so rich!

    #76145

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by icy on tribe.net.This couldnt have been any more perfect in timing for me. This is exactly what I am working on with my students. Cues and listening to the musicality and how to interprete it. So, this is helping me help them...thank you!!!!

    #76146

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Sandi on tribe.net.Yay! Glad to be of service. :}

    #76147

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Sandi on tribe.net.Great job, everyone, so far! I love to see those wheels turning and the thoughts being verbalized.br/br/The point in examining musicality is to notice whether you can "see" the music. That is the goal of the dancer - to show the audience what the music is doing. So, it may be that we traveled on different phrases, but it happened within melodic and/or rhythmic sections. Its a matter of using the right moves to compliment those sections. Making it make sense.br/br/In the group sense, what we want to see is setting each other up to take the lead on the beginning of phrases and some of that was in there. Also, each leader showcased a different move, which created a varied texture throughout.br/br/I think whenever we feel weve had a "so-so" performance, it is because weve missed too many cues or passed up too many phrase changes, which means weve passed up too many opportunities to really show off the music and do it justice.

    #76148

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Erika on tribe.net.hem... what I meant in the first line of my second paragraph was that the dancers are effortlessly surfing the waves of music, sorry, Ill try to make more sense next time!

    #76149

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Leslie on tribe.net.The Arabic Hip Twist Flourish is probably the move I miscue most often. I just made a note in my lesson plan to caution students about it, so thank you!br/br/Regarding musicality, I give my performers copies of the music set ahead of time, and we practice to that set in class, so that everyone gets to know the scores and can get a sense of timing. It feels so great when the move and the music are a perfect match. It can happen accidentally, but the perfect match can also happen accidentally-on-purpose, yes? The shoulder shimmy combos were what seemed perfectly matched to the music in this footage, on both occasions. In the last section of the song (quite a few remaining measures of violin) there were a lot of E. basics that made me think the lead dancer was waiting to cue spins to end the song in just the right spot. How do ending moves so often come out perfectly? Im thinking LOTS of practice, or arranging ahead of time for someone who really knows when/where to take the lead and finish the song.

    #76150

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Sandi on tribe.net.That was pure luck on my part. I had only heard the song a few times before performing to it. ;}

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