Egyptian for bad knees

This topic contains 3 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 1 year, 8 months ago.

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  • #75166

    Anonymous

    I'm interested to see if anyone has modified Egyptian so there is little to no torque on the knees.  One of my new beginning students has experienced knee problems, torn meniscus, in the past and we want to avoid re injuring the knee. Let me know if anyone has any advice on how to modify this move.

    #99429

    Anonymous

    I have bad knees and the Egyptian is one move I have never had trouble with. My understanding of it (or the way I do it, right or wrong) is the swivel is mostly from the hip, and the weight is in the leg that isn't swiveling, so there isn't any pressure or torque on the knee.

    #99430

    Anonymous

    Thanks!  That's what I've been coming up with the more that I ask around.  So long as the whole leg moves together from toe to hip, there will be no torque in the knee.What other moves do you find that you have difficulties with?  I was just trying to plan out our beginner session together and anywhere there might be problem areas for someone with bad knees so that I can find and work through modifications ahead of time. 

    #99431

    Anonymous

    Nothing too much in the L1 vocab – my main problem is with levels, and occasionally stability in turns. But if you usually teach barefoot, and particularly if the studio you teach in has carpet make sure she knows that it is OK for her to wear dance shoes. I find on a lot of flooring if I am barefoot my feet tend to stick a little bit, which torques my knees even in slower turns. But every problematic knee is different, so it'll be a lot of checking in with her, really emphasising posture so her weight is evenly distributed and knees are soft etc. The normal stuff!

    #99432

    Anonymous

    The Egyptian should not be knee-torquing.  Remember that the swivel begins with opening up the knee, then moving to the “noon” position, never crossing that center line.  So, right knee opens to about 3 o'clock, moves to noon.  Left knee opens to about 9 o'clock and moves to noon.Camel walk could be another knee-torquing move, also requiring alignment of the knee forward.  But that is for a higher level class.  And as Alicia said, levels can be challenging for injured knees, as well as sticky floors/feet.  For someone who is injured and has been through therapy for it, they will/must know what their limits are. 

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