Music licensing

This topic contains 9 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 2 years, 10 months ago.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)
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  • #74926

    Anonymous

    Question for those with studios or know about this kind of thing…We recently opened a studio, and I've been looking through our music playlists to see who (if any) are represented by ASCAP or BMI. So far the majority are not on their lists, just the odd song or two that I've dropped while we work out licensing.I was under the impression that Helm (which is about 80% of my class music selections) had given permission to FCBD and the SS's to use their music in class. Is that correct or just a rumor?As to the actual ASCAP/BMI licensing, does anyone know a cost? I know it's dependent on studio size (ours is very small) and number of students (also extremely small right now, sadly), but I'm hoping for a ballpark figure.

    #97564

    Anonymous

    I was basically forced to subscribe to ASCAP so that they wouldn't sue me.  I only teach ATS® classes and tried to explain that.  It was cheaper to pay the $130 annually than hire a lawyer.

    #97565

    Anonymous

    I've been pondering this myself.  I didn't see Helm on the ASCAP list but I did see Karim Nagi, Phil Thornton and Hossam Ramzy.  Hmmm.

    #97566

    Anonymous

    Because I host a big event I have ASCAP. It covers me at my studio, anything I dance in or promote. Liek Terri said, way easier than the alternative. It's an insurance policy, really.

    #97567

    Anonymous

    I'm no expert, but if you're just using the music in class, you can use any music you want, can't you?  It is when you intend to film and sell with music without permission when you get into trouble.  Any music used for profit would need to be paid for.  Though there is music out there put out independently and many times you can contact the artist directly and ask for permission to use their music.  I've been working with using an unusual throat singing song for awhile now and since it's 11 min long, I've needed to edit it.  I just contacted the artist and asked if it was okay if we used it and that I edit it.  He was thrilled his music was being used for dance!

    #97568

    Anonymous

    I've heard that ASCAP is the most obnoxious.  But basically they have gone after teachers for the music they play in their classes as well as performers and event promoters.  Today I learned about SESAC.  I had not heard of them.  But I was told to be safe with music licensing you'd need a license from ASCAP, BMI and SESAC.  That's alot of money.  I couldn't find which company Helm is affiliated with though.  Does anyone know?

    #97569

    Anonymous

    Actually, since class is considered “public” and people are paying to be there, you technically do need a music license for playing music in class. 

    #97570

    Anonymous

    So does the music license cover you only in specific locations – such as being licensed through a particular studio. Or does the license cover me whenever and where I teach and/or perform?

    #97571

    Anonymous

    You can submit that you only use music that was created for you (Helm, FCBD, Inc., etc.) and they'll ask for a list of songs.But I agree with Terri that it would be easier to pay the yearly fee so you can use commercial music as well.

    #97572

    Anonymous

    That's so odd that it should apply to dance classes as well.  I am a professor in my other life, and copyright law allows for educational use – that goes for any music I play in a college class, or a film I show, a poem I photocopy, etc.  It's good for one year – after that, if it's included in my 'reader' that I create for my class, I have to ask for rights permissions (which my bookstore arranges) and it's no problem.  I really don't see why that copyright law shouldn't also apply to dance teaching.  The teachers who teach dance at the college don't pay for rights to play the music in class unless they are publishing their work for posterity or sale.  Why should dance studios be different?

    #97573

    Anonymous

    Leigh Anne, most universities do have licenses with various content providers and with the copyright clearinghouse that take care of things that might stretch the boundaries of 'fair use.' (Those boundaries aren't as simple and expansive as most people think.)I'd put my money on the unis paying ASCAP, too, to cover the use of music in various public contexts. Anyway, the intellectual property world definitely doesn't treat dance classes at a studio or gym the same as classes that are part of an accredited educational institution.

Viewing 11 posts - 1 through 11 (of 11 total)

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