musicality

This topic contains 5 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 3 years ago.

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  • #74871

    Anonymous

    When teaching to a new song and focusing on musicality do you find it works best to:a.  dance it and have your students follow you several/many times through it as you dance it completely improv (meaning no choreography or pre-planned steps, so it will come out different every time, but follows the music)b.  you choreograph it and have your students follow you through it several/many timesc.  you choreograph it and teach it in sections having your students learn the entire piece of music in a choreography that they can dance without necessarily having to follow you through, and later remove the choreography and dance it completely improv.Thanks!

    #97079

    Anonymous

    I would choose A, mostly.  People learn music in different ways.  They don't always hear it the same way you do.  Some need to listen to it over and over before dancing it.  Some people just need to keep dancing to it.  Some people need to map the landscape of it out on paper.  Some people need to relate to it with visuals.  Some people need to hear it translated in musical terms – rhythm, melody, phrasing, cadence, etc. I don't like using choreography to learn how to improv to music, but there are places in music where you find a perfect movement to showcase that bit.  It may help some to choreograph it in order for them to do the homework and really listen to the identities of sections/rhythms/etc., but I would not want them to attach the choreography to that piece every time.I'm more of a visual learner, so when I hear a piece of music, I can submerge myself into it and see a design or a landscape or colors to help identify parts.  I sometimes like to show that in goofy dance or on the white board.  🙂

    #97080

    Anonymous

    Thanks Sandi,  that is mostly how I have been doing it, but I am still having a lot of trouble with a few students who are just not getting it.  Last week we listened to a fairly easy piece of music that was phrased in 4 – 8c sections . I counted it for them and asked them to just stay within a family for each 32c section and I still had some changing families in the middle of those.  I am guessing those people may need some other way of learning.  Maybe those do need a “loose choreography” just for homework to really be able to see and feel the music?  I too was afraid of them memorizing it and then not being able to dance it the way they feel it though.

    #97081

    Anonymous

    Wow, Sandi, what you said just made a major light bulb go off.  I tend to learn better visually as well (to the point of color coding my Shakespeare texts in college…don't ask 😛 ) but I guess I never realized I do it with music as well.  I wouldn't say landscapes but definitely shapes (squiggles, jagged lines, etc) and patterns.  I will definitely have to explore working that to my advantage!

    #97082

    Anonymous

    Megan, exactly!  Lines, dots, squiggles all help me with identifying the sections of music.  I think it is good for us all to know how we learn, so we can keep a look out for those clues when someone is teaching or learning.

    #97083

    Anonymous

    Definitely!  We have a song we just danced to (Supernova, one that Wendy's students danced to at Tribalfest a couple years back) and the end has these cascading notes…I made a comment to a troupemate about the “bubbles” and she looked at me like I was nuts, so I had to explain 🙂  In my head, something about those notes just makes me think of bubbles drifting towards the surface of the water.I am endlessly fascinated by how other people process information, and how it helps them learn.  Awesome info 😀

    #97084

    Anonymous

    I like to play the music and then ask the question ” What does this piece of music suggest to you?”

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