Name Origin of Movements

This topic contains 7 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 5 years, 9 months ago.

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  • #73093

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Diana on tribe.net.Ive been dancing ATS for a couple of years and currently working towards my certifications, but I never wonder how the moves got their names.. I have always accepted that similar moves will have different names depending on the style of belly dancing. LIke the Taxeem or the Arabic. Now Im obsessively curious. br/br/I know this topic has been posted several years back, but Im hoping that a current discussion will bring in more insight. If anyone knows how the Taxeem got its name in particular, I would greatly appreciate it! And, perhaps, sleep better at night. br/br/Thanks!

    #81603

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Diana on tribe.net.There are references to origins of some of the moves in Carolenas Tribal Talk. I believe the word Taxeem means slow and the ATS Taxeem is very slow. That may be why its named that.

    #81604

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Erika on tribe.net.Hi Diana, Im a curious person too :). I asked myself a long time ago, and was told by a beautiful Oriental Dance teacher that "taxeem" is actually a musical term that indicates that tipical slow intro of the instruments, before getting to the actual song. This part is improvised, and builds athmosphere and drama. The dancer cant just predict where the next beat will be, so she uses slow, serpentine moves, and a hip vertical eight it comes very handy. She can try to follow the swirls of the music by accelerating or slowing down the curves of the eight. The vertical eight became a tipical move seen during the "Taxeem", so dancers started to call the move "Taxeem". Im not sure if all of this is accurate, but thats what I know about it 🙂

    #81605

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Mark Bell on tribe.net.Just so you know the musical reference: Taksim ( or any spelling variation you like) means improvised part and can be either slow, medium, or fast. A slow ciftetelli is used a lot, especially recently in place of a wahda. Ciftetelli can also be played extremely fast, usually in Greek or Turkish music. Slow taksims can be arhythmic (no beat), rhythmic without percussion, or rhythmic with percussion. Mawal, I believe, is the term used for the arythmic without percussion, similar i many ways to alap in classical Indian music.

    #81606

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Erika on tribe.net.Thanks for chiming in and clarify, Mr. Bell!

    #81607

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Shay Moore on tribe.net.A lot of the move names in the ATS vocabulary today were coined by Jamil Salimpour. Arabic, Egyptian Basic, Maya (reverse taqsim), etc were all names she gave to the moves back in the 60s. She largely assigned the names based on the dancers she saw performing them in the clubs every week--where the were from, what music they typically paired the moves with, etc. She had a manual she self-published way back when which covers the names, and if you ever get a chance to take a workshop from her, I recommend it heartily for a big history lesson of bellydance in America!

    #81608

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Diana on tribe.net.Thanks ladies! I love how our dance form has such a rich history.

    #81609

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Diana on tribe.net.And thank you as well Mark!

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

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