New arms for double bump?

This topic contains 5 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 2 years, 1 month ago.

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  • #75090

    Anonymous

    Dear sisters! The way I've done and teached double bump is that both arms go forward only alternating in height, so in the first part the the left is forward in shoulder height and the right arm is up, behind the ear. In the second part, they switch places only with a little less angle so the left arm is still forward, lifted to about 45 degrees wile the right arm is forward at shoulder height, so that you come to look at the audience over your right upper arm, creating a diagonal as the right leg goes back. Now, my students have been told by other dancers that there is a new way of placing the arms in the second part of the step, where the right arm goes out to the side instead of to the front, opening the chest towards the audience as the right leg goes back. According to the people they talked to, you can do it either way but it looks and feels completely different!What should I say to them, do you think there been a misunderstanding or is this indeed a new approved way of doing the step that we should adapt to?Love, Katarina

    #98923

    Anonymous

    I dont`know this … ??? Think, that was misunderstood. I just love the arm over head and the strong silhouette of this step.

    #98924

    Anonymous

    Ok, a whole post disappeared today when the forum was acting up.I initially learned the double bump with the right arm crossing the body on counts 3 and 4. I now believe that that was a symptom of DVD learning. Since, I've been taught that the arm position for double bumps is essentially arms 2 for counts 1 and 2 and arms 1 for counts 3 and 4. This is a much more open look. Be careful that your right arm doesn't block your face, especially if the audience is lower than the stage.'Essentially' because the body angle in double bumps is more pronounced, so the right arm in arms 1 ends up out towards the audience rather than towards the right front corner. But way more open rather than closed across the body.

    #98925

    Anonymous

    ^what Diana said.

    #98926

    Anonymous

    I agree with what Diana says.  Double bump has so many moving parts and, as such, is one of those moves in which you occasionally discover nuances that you didn't recognize or acknowledge before.  It's possible that your students are interpreting something they think they are seeing, and thinking that it has a different physical representation.  I would sit with them and watch a couple of videos to clear up any misunderstanding.

    #98927

    Anonymous

    Ok, I learned the way of the soft crossing of the body (audience view) of the right arm on the 3 & 4 count.The start for the 1 & 2 count is still the same with the left arm softly rounded at shoulder height and right is up and open (elbow back) to the audience. I have not heard of a formal "change" of the right arm being more out to the side like a pivot bump, but yet I see it all the time.  One of my students was/is doing this movement in her dancing.  I prefer how I learned but that might be my "old fart" mentality in the dance, since I learned it so long ago.  Now, does that mean I dance it that way? I follow the leader as closely as I can if I see style differences. 🙂  I don't make a huge deal about it if it is just a body shape difference, a persons ability to move a certain way difference etc. but if it is extreme then, I question the movement itself but I will mimic whatever I see in performance and ask about it later. 🙂Yes, I do dance with people in performance that I don't dance with on a regular basis, that is what is great about this dance is that ability to do just that...dance with strangers, who become friends. 🙂

    #98928

    Anonymous

    I looked at some videos recently, and while watching the Double Bump being performed ist sudenly struck me that this more open position may not so much be a matter of the arm position, but instead one of the body angle, or the position of the viewer in relation to the stage. In that video the arms were held and moved the way that I had learned, but still the right arm didn't appear to cross the chest on count 3 and 4, because the dancer was't quite as much facing the front left corner.

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