Preparing for a performance

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  • #73116

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by marylittlegoth on tribe.net.Hello there! Im a relative beginner and definite student! Ive been doing ATS for about 2.5 years but not intensively due to work and study commitments.br/br/Id be really grateful for peoples thoughts and advice about preparing for a performance. Im a dab hand with a needle so the costuming side is not an issue. br/br/What Im looking for is stuff about picking and working with the music, how far in advance do you pick the music? Rehearsals, how much do you rehearse, how and when do you plan a broad outline of the performance (obviously only a broad outline as its improv!). Do people get together for formal rehearsals? What do you need to feel prepared?br/br/Thanks!br/br/Mary.

    #81739

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Lucy on tribe.net.Hi :)br/br/I really need to feel I know the music well so I can work past the stage of just dancing the steps to the beat. Sometimes I hear a track and think itd work for improv then with a dance or two realise no, actually, its beyond-me-fast especially when I try zilling with it. If I cant zill to it comfortably I dont like to use it.br/br/I prefer to watch ATS performances that are broken into songs performed by duets, trios etc, then the next song being the next set of dancers, rather than one or two long tracks with more of a vending machine approach...also mixing it up with dancing a fast piece, then a slow piece, then another fast piece to finish to give zill hands a rest.br/But if you choose a piece that switches from fast-slow during the track and learn it really well it can look awesome when everyone bursts into - say - an Egyptian as the beat kicks in :)br/br/Jesse gave us a good tip at a workshop last weekend; make a playlist of about ten tracks that you want to perform to at some point, then listen to that over and over instead to spare you the madness of just listening to your performance track or two over and over again :Pbr/br/I have to feel comfy in my costume and confident that its not going to fall apart mid-way through, so like to get it finished well in advance - nothing like being scrunched up in front of the sewing machine the night before a performance, or worse, sewing in the car on the way there...br/br/I also like to do the moving meditation with fellow dancers before I go on. I find it focuses my nerve-filled brain. I tell myself and everyone else involved "Carolena is with us! We can do this!" - might be a little bonkers...but it helps.br/br/I think if you cant get together with the group to practice regularly it is worth everyone agreeing to take responsibility for their own development / practice outside of group practice - attending workshops if poss, doing our homework arm undulations, watching the DVDs etc. Everyone has different amounts of time to donate to their dance though and it depends on the group and how serious / busy things are I guess. xx

    #81740

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by jesse on tribe.net.Hi Mary! Nice to see you on tribe :)br/br/ditto on what Lucy has said. br/br/For a performance, I like to be comfortable and confident in the costuming Im in, the music Im dancing to and the movements Im dancing!br/br/We tend to discuss what kind of performance were doing (is it for the BD community - or a more "western ear") and then choose our music from a track list of songs we are familiar with and have at least one or two run throughs - and then talk about what we thought worked or didnt work (do those tracks work together...ect). Then again, there is only the two of us..so it does make it a bit more relaxed! We feel where is is improv - we should at least be prepared with a polished set to present - especially if our audience has little or no idea what ATS is.br/br/For our students - we give them Three hour and a half sessions to put together a set for a show. If they cant make it to all three - then they arent a part of the performance (harsh, but fair to the people who put in the effort) For the first rehearsal, we decide on music from either music they bring in, or music we tend to work with in class, so they have time to familiarize themselves with the phrasing or feel of the track and we tend to talk about the space well be dancing in - so they know if well have a 1, 2, 3 or even a 4 sided audience. Then we move onto formations or concepts we would like to present (this gives students time to let others know which movements they arent entirely comfortable pulling out...ect) and the final rehearsal is a dress rehearsal or run throughs just to give everything a general polish. I find that these rehearsals not only help with the dance, but it give dancers time to connect with eachother on a different level than being in dance class. They discuss, come up with ideas and connect with eachother in a more peer to peer way - always with Philippa and I taking the lead of course, well always give them our input and advise on this stuff :)br/br/Hope that answers your question! 🙂 jesse

    #81741

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Lisa on tribe.net.Ditto to what Lucy and Jesse has said.br/br/We do all of the above.br/br/Making it look seamless is knowing your moves, knowing your music, knowing your audience and knowing what "shapes" to make.

    #81742

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by marylittlegoth on tribe.net.Thanks everyone, thats cool. br/br/Its interesting the difference between the professional and student performances. Is this due to differences in ability, or does it also have to do with numbers. It seems to me that with a duo where you work together closely and regularly, you will have a more intuitive grasp of each others abilities and style. Do you find increased numbers changes the way you prepare?

    #81743

    Anonymous

    Originally posted by Lisa on tribe.net.Remember, your performance will only be as strong as your weakest dancer. That goes for both professional and student performances.br/br/I dont mean that in a derogatory fashion either.br/br/There is absoloutely no point pulling out a layback when you have come out of a chorus with someone who simply cannot do one.br/br/I think your post is referring to the "flow" that Carolena recently spoke about in her fireside chat. You will pick up nuances of the people you dance with regularly and find they will have a pre cue cue... if that makes sense. It may be a set of the shoulders or a very slight head movement but you can 99.9% of the time know what they are about to cue.br/br/Increased numbers gives you more scope for a "show". Theres chorusing, circling and so on and so forth but your fellow dancers need to be in tune with the shapes you are trying to make for the audience.br/br/Even though we are improvised, we still have sessions beforehand to make sure people know where they are at any given time in the music if it is the music that is telling them to be somewhere. Does that make sense too?br/br/For me, as you know I dance usually as a duet, but I have a performing troupe made out of my students. I dont prepare any differently because I know their abilities and where they dont feel comfortable. Its just visually you can give more wow and pizazz with huge shape changes.br/br/In our troupe sessions, we have a list of tracks that we have all decided on and we simply just dance to them and throw some shapes for different scenarios and they usually will be ones we will choose for a performance because we are familiar with them.

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