Taking effective notes

This topic contains 6 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 2 years, 4 months ago.

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  • #75048

    Anonymous

    Does anyone have any tips on how to take useful notes in workshops etc? I find that even if I review my notes that evening, I can't remember what they meant! I survived university, so I do have note taking skills in an academic setting, but as soon as I try to apply those skills to movement, they let me down.

    #98656

    Anonymous

    Alicia,I do the same thing!  I find drawing diagrams or pictures on the side helps me to remember.  I also often ask a friend to film me during breaks to remember complicated movements that I am afraid my notes won't capture adequately.Finally, I don't try to write neatly, but rather take a blank notebook and write big.  That way, I can really take space on the page to write what I need to remember without worrying about staying "in the lines."Terri

    #98657

    Anonymous

    When possible I like to review my notes with someone else's  notes at the workshop.  I also like to try to transcribe my notes shortly after the workshop while everything is still fresh in my mind.  I have also had some really positive experiences with sending emails to the instructors to clarify things I wasn't sure if I was remembering correctly. 

    #98658

    Anonymous

    Great topic for us compulsive note-takers! I take a tablet that's small enough to stick in my choli or hip band or put down at my feet without tripping on it. I take only minimal notes during the class; for instance, the names of the movements covered, key words in especially salient comments by the teacher. The briefer the in-class notes, the more present I can be in the class. Then I try to sit down a.s.a.p. after the class and write the notes up thoroughly, so they will be intelligible later on.

    #98659

    Anonymous

    Thanks for the thoughts, everyone! I think writing big and just the odd keyword then comparing notes with someone else will help. Great ideas!

    #98660

    Anonymous

    Probably not much help to those who can't, but I take my notes in shorthand (god bless those school days)!I do diagrams too, headings, key word, leave lines between each move so things don't get muddled, etc.As soon as I'm home I type up my notes exactly as they're written, even if they don't make sense at the time, and then go back over them to make them intelligible.Comparing and sharing notes with the other dancers is good too 🙂

    #98661

    Anonymous

    I'm happy to take questions for clarifications before, during and after workshops.  Emails also.  Or posting here can be helpful.  You'll get many different responses and experiences that are great!

    #98662

    Anonymous

    My Style seems like a lot of work when you read my explanation, but it's really not. I find that the visual and words help cement it in my brain. Recording the moves is also very helpful!!Diagrams: I tend to use 2-3 different diagrams depending on the move: foot work, arms and positioning. These are usually ovals for feet in direction where foot should be placed. Simply labeled as L or R. For arms/Shoulder work I use up, down, Left, right arrows and curves arrows for circling/curved arm movements in the direction they go. For positioning I use small dots where the leader is  darkened dot and just move the dots to their new positions.Notes:Short hand is nice, but I find that I've not yet set up a shorthand-for-ATS.I tend to stick with bulletsThe name of the move followed by beat count/style of positioning (if specific)

Viewing 8 posts - 1 through 8 (of 8 total)

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