Teaching ATS® at a college?

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  • #74745

    Anonymous

    The local community college offers non-credit, enrichment classes (art, dance, photography etc) and they are hiring dane instructors in any style. They already offer bellydance (cabaret) but i know they don't have tribal at all (though they have a course on Dances of the silk road that touches on basically the roots of dance and the like).  I just applied to teach ATS® there. Hopefully I get the job and they like the proposal I wrote up. Is anyone else out there teaching ATS® at a college or Community education/non-credit program?Thoughts? Experiences? is this even a thing I should pursue outside of teaching at the regular "dance/fitness studio" venues?

    #96249

    Anonymous

    I am pretty sure that one or two of the Tamarind ladies teach at colleges. Laura Murphy also used to in CT, but I'm not sure if she had good luck with it or not.

    #96250

    Anonymous

    Awesome, thanks!

    #96251

    Anonymous

    HI Adhara, I teach ATS at community ed college in Scotland and have done for 4 years.  Ive found it to be a fantastic experience.  Classes themselves  are just like regular dance class at private fitness studios but in the college there is a real sense of promotion of what you do. The college are always promoting activities they offer and involving all of their classes in special events, so my students get lots of safe opportunities to perform and to a supportive audience. It's also great that the college office deals with all the admin, enrolment and fees and advertise your classes in brochures etc. As a direct result of the college we've been featured on tv, ran workshops and invited to dance at many interesting occasions, so for me and the students  the experience has been really positive.  I do have to provide learning objectives and class schedules to the college.  The classes only run alongside term time so there can be long breaks between terms which is hard for the newer students  and interrupts progression.    Hope that is helpful?  🙂

    #96252

    Anonymous

    Susan, Thank you sooooo much!  taht's a great bit of info.  I don't know if I'll be getting it yet, I just applied an dgave a proposal with an Overview of ATS®. being that I teach directly from the FCBD® syllabus and I have developed my own syllabi for my other classes, I'm really used to creating schedules and printing my lesson plans and such (i used to teach art at the Elementary level ad had to do the same too). I'm just really hoping to build ATS® in South Florida since there are so few of us that are certified instructors/Sister Studios down here (two of us are in one troupe 😉 ).        It'd be great to really get the word out there that is a great and legitimate style of dance that the community can learn and participate in and not just some secret thing that dancers get into once they have been dancing for a while.  It seems that most students I have have come from other dance studios after having tried other belly dance styles and not really finding what they were looking for. Then they find ATS® and fall in love with the social/group dance aspects that they thought they would find in other styles of belly dance.  I hope i get a shot at an interview and to really show the school what it's all about.I imagine I could also invite those students to continue with me or my Dance partner and fellow sister studio, Carla during semester breaks at our studios to keep them dancing if they are really interested? I teach out of 2 spaces right now and I could always line up my schedule to include classes during semester breaks.  this sounds so wonderful that the college really promotes your classes, it's really hard to get the word out to non-dancers. Thanks again for the reply!

    #96253

    Anonymous

    Hello!  I'm Super Beth from Tamarind.  I have a student that teaches in Fond du Lac as a non-credit ATS class.  She really enjoys it.  I teach at UW Milwaukee, but my classes can actually be taken for credit or audit.  They are open to community members as well, but are primarily taken for credit.  Therefore, I have to have a syllabus and give out grades.  I teach several levels and a couple of our members have even come from my classes.  I really enjoy teaching at the college.  It fits well into my organized nature.  Beth

    #96254

    Anonymous

    Hi.Thanks for this post. I will have to study it more as I want to teach an ATS(R) course at my university. I am aiming for the summer to start the class. 🙂 -Margaret

    #96255

    Anonymous

    After getting a request from Janine in Richmond, VA, it dawned on me that some others might find how I structure my class valuable.  In the interest of sharing, I figured I would just disclose my Level 1 syllabus with everyone here.  Ultimately, the best structure for a class comes from the Fat Chance format.  Your syllabus should be your own ideas that are germinated from your own personal experiences.  I respectfully request you do NOT make this information open to the general public as in posting on facebook, social media sites, or other websites.  I am very proud of my work, but it requires some explanation.  It's meant to provide an idea of things you could incorporate into a class.Most individuals (I know) who teach at a university are usually teaching a class that is a community based class that has no grading or credit matriculation.  If I were running a community, non-credit class, I would just use the Fat Chance Level 1 format.  (If it ain't broke, don't fix it)My course is unique in that I am actually a professor at the school; and my class can be taken for college credit.  As a result, it requires grading for individuals looking to take it for credit (though the course can be audited for pass or fail as well).  That said, I do not quiz or have a final written exam in my course.  They are graded primarily on attendance with a journal requirement and the "final" is a student salon (hafla performance).  I do not grade on how well someone performs the technique per se.  It's meant to be fun, but still educational and enriching.  For level 1, there are no requirements.  For intermediate (level 2) and advanced (level 3) levels, the requirement is to have taken the previous course.  (Ex. you need 1 to sign up for 2; and 2 to sign up for 3). My syllabus is set up based in part on my teaching schedule.  I choose to teach a 2 hour class once a week for the entire 14 week semester.  Because most individuals are not ready to dance for 2 straight hours, I am able to add enriching information to the class in lecture format.  This allows me to build them up physically and intellectually (and hopefully, build their confidence as well).  If you can't tell, I take my role as an educator seriously, but still make sure the students are having fun.  😀This is my Level 1 class syllabus.  The movement sequence is the Fat Chance sequence.Week 1 “Dancing Demo”      Introductions      Lecture: ATS History                Posture      Puja      Basic Arm Positions      Taxeem      Hand Floreo      4 Basic Steps with 3 Foot positions (Shimmy, Egyptian, Arabic, Pivot Bump/Choo-choo)        w/cues and transitions        Week 2 Lecture: Performance Video Showing                Arm Undulations      Formations for Lead and Follow      Egyptian Step w/half turn        Week 3 Lecture: Music                Zils      Review      Week 4 Lecture: Anatomy                Bodywave      Arabic Step          Week 5 Lecture: Costume & Make-up                Torso Twist      Pivot Bump/Choo Choo         w/arm 1 and arm 2        Week 6 Lecture: Costume – Craft Night        Week 7 Lecture: Dance Conditioning                Hip Circle      Circle Step      Shimmy Step        Week 8 Lecture: Layering Movements                Ribcage Rotation, Head Slides & Levels      Review        Week 9 No Lecture              Walking Taxeem      Walking Bodywave        Week 10 Lecture: Cues and Transitions                  Reverse Turn        Turkish Shimmy with 1/2 turn        Week 11 Lecture: Tattoos and Piercings                  Bellyrolls and Flutters        Camel Walk        Chorus Formation        Reach and Sit        Week 12 Lecture: Props                   Propeller Turn        Corkscrew Turn          Week 13 No Lecture        Review and Practice for Student Salon                Week 14 Student Salon!A little bit about me as an FYI only, in addition to my FCBD certification training, I have a bachelors degree and 2 Masters degrees which were required to be considered a candidate for teaching a "credit" class.  Usually, if you want to teach at a university that offers an outreach program for the community (not for credit), they will not require a masters degree or even a college degree (I have one of my students who is doing this).  I am also a certified pilates instructor and have a movement based background. 

    #96256

    Anonymous

    I've been teaching ATS at one of the local Chicago community colleges for around 8 years. I'm non-credit, though the Zumba teacher is a phys ed credit, go figure! Mostly it's worked out well, as I have run a club and a student troupe out of the college, plus had access to their beautiful stage. I had to work out my own curriculum and syllabus, building in some flexibility in the structure to allow for review and troubleshooting. As I have people come and go, that has also worked out well; they can miss a class without being completely lost.

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