Teaching on-going drop-in classes

This topic contains 6 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 1 year, 11 months ago.

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  • #75122

    Anonymous

    Does anyone have experience teaching on-going drop-in classes?  I usually teach classes in sessions with a set start and end date, but recently began teaching at a local fitness center where they run all of their classes on a completely drop-in basis.  I have been following along with the L1 format, but have a feeling at some point that will not work very well as I have new people every week, a few who have been there since the class started a few weeks ago, and some who come about every other week.  Add that to the fact that most of them have no idea what ATS® is even though it is in the title of the class.  I do send them to my website so those who return have a better idea since I don't have the time to go over the history in every class as the class is a strict 55 minutes and the next teacher is there kicking you out.Any tips would be much appreciated.Thanks!!

    #99093

    Anonymous

    I'm curious. In your contract, are you required to have a certain number attend class each week?

    #99094

    Anonymous

    I do.  My beginning ATS® class is ongoing and people can start at any point in the session they would like.  Is that what you mean?

    #99095

    Anonymous

    Terri, yes, that is what I mean.  They have no start and end dates at all for any of their programs at this studio, everything runs as on-going classes.  They use a punchcard system and students can attend any class offered.Diana, they just require that there be at least five in the class each week on average.  So far I have had 9 or 10, which isn't bad since it is mostly a zumba studio.

    #99096

    Anonymous

    I just switched to doing my classes drop-in, and I think it will work out. The first half of the class we drill everything together, then when it comes time to work in formations, I sometimes pair the experienced dancers together so they can take off, and sometimes pair them with newbies so they can help. Don't feel like you have to teach them everything about everything every single time, you can pepper things about history and musicality each class.

    #99097

    Anonymous

    I am also doing a drop in class as well. I have a core group of students that is consistent, and a few newbies each time. I make sure to tell them there is a mix of levels, and I focus on the Level 1 curriculum, focusing on two or three movements per class, and adding one movement as review (say we worked on Pivot bump and we do a drill; I quickly review Arabic and add it to the drill). Every once in a while I do class 1 again, presenting all 4 fast movements. I have also started doing zills, giving newbies the option to not play them until they have 3-4 classes under their belt. I also created a mailing list (optional) so I can send them links to drills and the the Mothership. It's working quite well for me so far!

    #99098

    Anonymous

    I have done it both ways and I really like offering Level 1 as drop in for these reasons:1.  People can start at any point in the curriculum.  Lots of times the enthusiasm or energy generated by seeing us perform or attending a party (two of our primary means of attracting new students) can wane if the person has to wait 2,3,6, or 7 weeks to start class.2.  For my students who can't afford the session pass or can't attend regularly due to work schedules or chronic illness, they can purchase as they go by the class.3.  I have found that once I get people in the door, I can usually keep them. It is just a matter of making it convenient to get them in the door.Of course, upper level classes require more commitment and are more disruptive for students coming in and out.Just my two cents!  Terri

    #99099

    Anonymous

    Me too, am starting drop-in-classes in a fitness-center after the summer holidays, and had the same questiones like yours. First I'll start with L1, after a while there will be advanced lessons, too (but still not more than L1 and a very little of L2 vocabulary).At the moment I'm student in this center, taking ballett- and moderndance-classes, just to figure out, how do the other teachers structure their lessons. They work throught their basic moves, finishing with some steps of a choreography. Me, for myself, would like to structure my lessons with the L 1 vocabulary, each lesson with a pointing to a special movement, ongoing in a rotating system (like L 1 schedule). After a while there will be students with more experience, they can support the new ones. I hope, this will work.I know, that these groups, lessons and students will never come out of the basics of ATS, this implicates the system of this fitness-center with it's many many drop-in-and-out classses.If, after a while, there are students, who really want to make progress in ATS, I can offer them to enter my advanced group, which I train regularly in a private place.

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