Types of Learning

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  • #74596

    Anonymous

    I was thinking that the three types of learning hadn't really been discussed in a while and I thought it would be valuable to refresh our brains as instructors. This is an over simplified definition but I'd love to know if I'm on target or if I mixed them up. Visual- learns best through ideas and images ex.- body wave is like getting up from a chairAuditory- student learns best through verbal description of the mechanics of a movementKinesthetic (tactile)- repeating a learned move through movement. This would be the student who learns best by watching what you do and mimicking until it's learned.Would anyone expand on this?Thank you!

    #95398

    Anonymous

    I always thought that thinking about the different types of learning was important and often cater my teaching style to suit all three of these.1 - Describe Mechanics (Auditory)2 - Provide Visualizations (Visual)3 - Moving and Drilling (Kinesthetic)It's even better if you can somehow magically do all of this at once! ;D

    #95399

    Anonymous

    Awesome!  So I didn't mix them up, but I love your two word definitions. Stealing now. 😉

    #95400

    Anonymous

    Auditory learners also benefit from a chant like “forward middle forward, back middle back” using words to describe a shoulder shimmy, in this example.  Kinesthetic learners would benefit from a teacher tracing the trapezius muscles along the backs of each student during practice for Egyptian basic. And they would remember what the pull of a length of elastic feels like during Egyptian arms, or using a cane or dowel during Turkish shimmy or Arabic hip twist with flourish.  Visual learners need images, pictures, tape on the floor, signs at each of the pivot points, etc.  I even learned about four other learning styles, including interpersonal, intrapersonal, mathematical, spatial-logistic during my public school teacher training, that has helped me identify more components.  Carolena will say not to talk too much, so be careful not to go on and on unless a student isn't getting it through the traditional three.

    #95401

    Anonymous

    Visual- learns best through ideas and images ex.- body wave is like getting up from a chair

    Oh, I never thought of the bodywave in that way. I had to try it out immediately. ;D And it's true! Thank you for this image! 8)

    #95402

    Anonymous

    I have to admit that I have trouble teaching in the ways that I don't learn.  Anyone else?I would say my learning is auditory and kinesthetic so I really have trouble teaching visualizations.  I generally don't come up with them on my own, but borrow the ones I've heard from others.

    #95403

    Anonymous

    Brandi, I have trouble with visualizations, as well. I would love it if some charitable souls would share their most useful ones.  🙂

    #95404

    Anonymous

    Some of my favorite visualizations:Floreo:picking up an hour glass with the middle finger and thumb and carefully turning it over.Reverse floreo: picking a flower and smelling it

    #95405

    Anonymous

    Taxeem: Scooping ice cream with the hips

    #95406

    Anonymous

    The counter top is one I use frequently, not only in reference to the horizontal arms.  In discussion about isolating the hips (in taqsim or even a shimmy), I have students imagine that if they were standing behind a tall counter, the person opposite would not be able to tell that the hips were moving.  I also use the image of turning a doorknob to help with floreos, and have everyone pretend that they have wet nails to keep energy projecting outward.  In ribcage rotation, I use the baseball diamond image, so that chest moves toward first base, then out to second, slides over to third, and finally home base for neutral (not in the dugout--no chest collapsing).I could go on and on about the visuals, but my latest is using the idea of a book of ATS; the anaology is that each dancer takes a chapter as soon as they lead, and tells a story from beginning to middle to end.  I use all the metaphors I can think of: no surprise endings, skipped a page, heard that same story a minute ago, story is too long, one of our favorite stories, a real page turner, etc.  I actually covered a book, put my teacher notes inside as I was explaining and "read" it to them cover to cover.

    #95407

    Anonymous

    All slow moves … I ask them to visualise they are pieces of seaweed at the bottom of the ocean … their feet (roots) firmly rooted to the sea bed and everything from there up softly moving with the oceans currents all the way out to the tips of their fingers – feel the softness in the skin at the top of the skull and over the face – all bones, joints, muscles and skin softly flowing (except the muscles you're needing to engage of course!!).

    #95408

    Anonymous

    I tried to teach through three ways mentioned above and it didn't help me with 80% of students. The way of explanation that really works for most of my students is “layer cake” of body moves. Every step I'm explaining starting from the dynamics of the body weight and the layer on it one by one the dynamics of hips, chest, arms, whatever until we get a full step. After they get it we polish everynting with drilling.

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