Words to Cheer By

This topic contains 16 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 3 years, 10 months ago.

Viewing 15 posts - 1 through 15 (of 18 total)
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  • #74674

    Anonymous

    Greetings from Seattle! I've looked and looked on the web (and on this board, so as not to duplicate a topic) and would love some advice on words and cheers besides zaghareet-ing I can use from the chorus. I've gleaned a few things to say just by listening to my older sisters, but could you weigh in on what you like to shout from the sidelines? So far, I have:aiwa (is it EYE-wah or AY-wah?)yipsome sort of ayyyyYUP!and something like "yallah habibi!"Help a newbie not sound dumb? Much love to you all.

    #95845

    Anonymous

    The aiwa is not something we use in ATS® although it does tend to be used in other styles of tribal. We mainly use the zaghareet, but also a few yips (which can be used for a lead change if a group of student dancers are hogging the lead a bit to get their attention…lol…). The ayyyYUP you mention is pretty much the sound of the yip…Yalla habibi (which I think is along the lines of 'come here my love') is more cabaret. Personally, I would not want to hear that from an audience member or fellow dancer as I see ATS as strong and powerful not flirtacious…Another pet hate is the hissing you sometimes hear… 

    #95846

    Anonymous

    Yeah, we do not encourage the hissing.  We do use the “aiwa” on occasion for slow pieces.  Mostly, we zaghareet – softly for slow, loud for fast.  The trick is to make it sound joyful and not like a yell or scream.  Carolena describes it as a singing of “lalala” and I like that thought.

    #95847

    Anonymous

    I thought Yalla meant hurry up!

    #95848

    Anonymous

    My dance partner is Lenanese and speaks Arabic, and informs me that yallah, means both (literally) ya Allah, my God, or as Alicia is wondering at 'hurry up' – it just depends on the vocal indication you put behind the expression when you use it.. the same as 'come on'..Hope that helps  🙂

    #95849

    Anonymous

    Hello all, when I was in a past workshop someone asked Carolena this question and I thought she said the only acceptable sound for such is the zaghareet. I've told my students not to use yips, etc., especially if the tribal group is not strictly ATS as other groups may use vocal cues and this might confuse them if the audience is very close to the performers.  Is this not correct???

    #95850

    Anonymous

    I think it's fine if you stick to zaghareets only.  I'm not a big fan of the yips either.  It sounds like someone's pinching me in the butt.  But, I admit, I sometimes will finish a zaghareet with a kind of yip, where the pitch goes high at the very end.The idea is to be playful, but not too intrusive.  You want to encourage and add to the flavor of the event.  So, keep that in mind when choosing your "tribal cheer".  🙂

    #95851

    Anonymous

    Hiya folks, I've been to a few large ATS events and I have heard hissing during slow songs as encouragement :o.  With all due respect, why hissing (more like the sound of leaking tires)?  Totally caught me off guard.  :-*

    #95852

    Anonymous

    http://www.shira.net/advice/lifestyle/audience.htm – this is interesting, although not specifically tribal, and references the hissing!

    #95853

    Anonymous

    I just looked at several sites explaining the Greek word, opa, but found the definition to be less appropriate than I thought.  It's more like “watch out” than it is a compliment to a dancer.And, I have to add that overly confident, aggressive, loud zaghreets are not necessary, sometimes a distraction, and often ruin the enjoyment of a recorded performance.  If you are sitting near a recording device, "Opa!" keep your exclamations minimal.  We all get uber-excited to be in the same room with FCBD, but all too often the recordings are hard to watch because of all the background noise.  It's not your turn to show off your zaghreets; it's their turn to show off their dancing!

    #95854

    Anonymous

    I'm Greek, so I can step in here regarding Opa and the hiss.Opa! is an exclamation similar to the zaghareet. It's not really translatable into English. It can mean "Let's go!" or "I know, right?!" It's like a playful, heartfelt response to almost any casual situation.So, while it is not Arabic, it would be OK to use without much ado.I have heard it over-used by zeno's however, so less is definitely more when it comes to a Greek audience.The hiss has it's roots as a way for the shepherds to call to their sheep. It shows up in Greek folkdance as a way to say "Let's go!" similar to "Yalla" in Arabic culture (or Opa as mentioned above.) It's not the sexy snake-hiss that people would it to be, at least not to Greeks. They'd hear it and say "Why are they calling the sheep while the belly dancer is dancing in the night club?!"

    #95855

    Anonymous

    To be honest, there are days when I think my dancing resembles a sheep.Sort of connected to the words to cheer by, what do other dancers say for "good luck" before a performance? Break a leg seems weird for dancing...

    #95856

    Anonymous

    Wow, I never heard the hissing.  That would weird me out if I heard it but it's nice to know and be prepared for the possibility.  Baaaaaaa lolZina

    #95857

    Anonymous

    I hate the hissing.  Hate it.  Maybe it's because of how much tribal fusion we have in the northwest, but an MC at an event will often tell the audience about zaghareets and hissing.  To me, one of two things happens when you hiss at a dancer's slow movements.  Either:  1.  Only one or a few people hiss and you can't hear it over the music anyway or 2. A bunch of people do it and it sounds as if they are booing the dancers.  There's a reason they used to say “boo, hiss!”My favorite thing about the zaghareet is that once you get over how bizarre it feels to do at first and get used to using it, you find that you (and everyone else) tend to develop your own style.  It gets to where you can tell your friends' zaghareets from others.  I used to be extremely self-conscious about it, and would only zaghareet if someone else already was, but I don't have that problem anymore 🙂  One of my favorite things in the world is zaghareeting from the chorus to encourage baby dancers who are out there performing!Oh and on the Opa...we performed at a hafla once and a few audience members were Greek and used that, and it was awesome!  So often non-bellydance, American crowds don't know they can show their encouragement.  We're raised not to interrupt the performance, so everyone sits there politely and meanwhile the dancers are out there, wondering if anyone is enjoying the performance.  The Greek audience members were I think making even more noise than the bellydancers in the audience! 🙂

    #95858

    Anonymous

    Everyone has their individual style of zaghareeting?  I cough at the end.  Always.  Makes me not do it at all.  I clap my hands. lolZina

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