Wrap Around Turn, opening detail

This topic contains 8 replies, has 0 voices, and was last updated by  Anonymous 2 years, 5 months ago.

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  • #75016

    Anonymous

    Several of us were rehearsing the Wrap Around Turn this week and had a detailed question about the initial position of the front/right arm before turning to the back wall. (And of course, this DVD I have loaned out to a friend right now.)Should the right arm remain slightly wide (remaining somewhat right of center of torso) or should it cross in front of the torso (whether slightly or extremely toward the left of center of one's torso)? I seem to remember some details of keeping the body open and visible, and yet there was a question whether there was "any wrap" at all if the arm never came across the torso toward the left. (The rest of the move, we were all in agreement on technique.) -- Cat

    #98379

    Anonymous

    In a recent class with Kae, we were taught to keep the upper body open, with the right hand coming to just right of the center.This is how I've always done it, as I feel if I try to reach my arm all the way across my body, it not only covers my body, but it compromises my shoulder placement. I want to keep my shoulders down, and if I reach across, they want to come up. Does that make sense?

    #98380

    Anonymous

    Entirely makes sense! That matches some of my thoughts, but I'm always willing to admit that I might have misunderstood or mis-remembered something. 🙂

    #98381

    Anonymous

    In my view, it is dependent on how long your arms are and the length of time you are allowing for that part of the movement (floreo/gathering).  I have short arms so my right arm only gets to the mid point of my body before crushing in onto the chest and finishing the floreo.  If you have longer arms, your forearms may reach further across naturally and still maintain integrity of the posture.  Just be aware of shoulders being down, elbows lifted, arms at shoulder height (not across the face, please) and space around the chest (nobody wants their choli sleeve to get caught in their coin bra!).

    #98382

    Anonymous

    Awesome point to remember, Sandi, thank you! I have short arms and I dance with several *very* long armed women. This is an excellent point for me to keep in mind.  🙂

    #98383

    Anonymous

    In a class with Carolena in S.F. just a couple weeks ago, she stressed that the right arm's forearm should come parallel to the body.

    #98384

    Anonymous

    When I teach this, I often have my students go into the cue, and then go behind them and make sure both shoulders are down and back. If your right shoulderblade is in the right spot pulled down, it will be difficult to cross the centre line with your right hand  ;D

    #98385

    Anonymous

    In a recent class with Kae, we were taught to keep the upper body open, with the right hand coming to just right of the center.

    Just to the right of centre? Do you mean left of centre? If I do it to the right of centre my right elbow is sticking out a long way, and I don't think it has the feeling of gathering that I thought was part of the move.

    #98386

    Anonymous

    Alicia — Although you quoted Jesse's answer for your follow-up question, it did remind me of how I originally imagined the right/front wrist in relationship to my spine –> whether the right wrist came as far to center-of-torso as to be in line with the spine, or moves across past the spine more towards the left side of the torso, or the right wrist stays just to the right of the spine more in line with the right breast. But as I've understood some of the answers, when focusing on the shoulders and the elbows, I think this simplifies my original concerns from the question and brings me back to considering good posture and then each dancers' length of arms in proportion to their torso. And then with good posture, all seems well! 🙂--Cat

    #98387

    Anonymous

    When I teach this, I often have my students go into the cue, and then go behind them and make sure both shoulders are down and back. If your right shoulderblade is in the right spot pulled down, it will be difficult to cross the centre line with your right hand  ;D

    This is such an awesome point to make. I love this idea and will surely use it in my teachings since it focuses on 3 things at once while being so simple: Proper Posture, feeling and knowing you body while you dance, and correct arm positioning for this move.Thank you!  ;D

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